Exterior shot at sunset of the Science and Engineering Hall

About Us

Purpose

The Office of Graduate Admissions and Student Services at the George Washington University's School of Engineering and Applied Science serves to:

  1. Provide information to prospective students on admission to graduate programs at SEAS.

  2. Provide technical and programmatic support to incoming students.

  3. Support current students with academic advising and career development.

About the School of Engineering and Applied Science

Initially named the Corcoran Scientific School, the GW School of Engineering and Applied Science was established by William Corcoran in 1884. In 1947, alumnus Charles Hook Tompkins donated $22,500 to the university to build a dedicated facility for the engineering and computer science disciplines. Tompkins Hall served as the primary location of SEAS courses, labs, and faculty offices until January 2015 when the school moved into the 100,000-square-foot Science and Engineering Hall.

Today, SEAS is ideally situated to take full advantage of today’s advances in engineering. Located in the heart of one of the largest and most comprehensive technology centers in the nation, we harness our strong connections to influential institutions to deliver a unique combination of research, learning and leadership experiences for our students.

Recognizing the range of opportunities available here, our outstanding faculty members join GW from some of the nation’s other top engineering schools. At SEAS, they foster a tightly knit community where faculty and students develop innovative technologies that help address many of the big challenges of our day. 

About George Washington University

The George Washington University was founded by an Act of Congress in 1821 based upon the desires of our nation's first president, George Washington. Believing the nation's capital to be a logical site for a national institution of higher learning, Washington's dream was carried out by the Rev. Luther Rice to establish the university with support from President James Monroe and 32 members of the U.S. Congress.